Scratch++

Jumana R, Nora M, Cynthia C

We wanted to teach younger children what made us fall in love with coding, the joy of creation and a sense of being involved in the process. Our game walks the user through pseudo-code that creates a simple pong game, something that would be difficult for a child with no coding experience to make even on scratch. We show them explanations that run alongside the code as each line appears and have places that allow for input. The user then gets to play the game with the modifications that they set, such as size or color. This gives them both a chance to learn and a sense of involvement in the process.

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game

Young children aren’t being exposed to computer science logic and thinking. This does not create a level playing field, as those who exposed to the basic logic from a young age. Many people are thus discouraged when they first start CS. It is often difficult when starting a new skill to feel able, accomplished and involved. In CS, the reward is often creating something, but in order to experience that feeling you must achieve a certain degree of mastery.

This game both teaches users the basics of coding and gives them a taste of what they can create. By allowing for user input that changes the end product, the user feels engaged and involved in a way they wouldn't if you just told them what a conditional was. We created a game that walks users through a basic pseudo-code in order to teach these skills.

We had to figure out how to get JS Processing to receive input from an HTML form because there is no way to get text input from JS Processing. We solved it by making a JS function that called a JS Processing function that changed a variable.

I learned a lot-Ruby Simon

We are a group made up of NYC high schoolers, both juniors and senior. We wanted to create a coding game that was fun and accessible to younger ages. We had a lot of fun making this product and hopefully people have fun playing and learning with it.

This project was made by Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program students at AIG - Ada Lovelace.